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was adviser to four presidents, president obama asked them to lead his afghanistan-pakistan paula's review in early 2009, and do that for a couple of months before apple first returning to brookings. bruce has written two books in the time has been a, a third is about to come out and i will mention that in the second of the first two were about al qaeda and then about the is pakistan relationship. so the search for al qaeda, the deadly embrace, his new book coming out next month is avoiding armageddon. it's a story by the u.s.-india pakistan relationship and crisis management over the last half-century or so. general stan mcchrystal is a 1976 graduate of west point, spent 34 years in u.s. army, retiring as a four-star general the summer 2010. he has been command in afghanistan. use the correct of the joint staff but perhaps the military circles most of all as i mentioned this five year period at joint special operations command makes a memorable and historic. general casey at his retirement ceremony in 2010 said of general stand, the thrill is stand has done more to carry the fight of al q
once coalition forces leave in 2014. diplomats in afghanistan, pakistan and the united states will participate. you can watch the event live beginning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span2. >> people who describe themselves as libertarians, dependent which we look at you might begin between 10 and 15%. if you ask questions like if you give people a battery of questions about different ideological things do you believe in x., do you believe and why, and you can't and you track of two different ideologies, and in a witch boy you're looking at you get up to maybe 30% of americans that's calling themselves a libertarian. if you ask the following questions, are you economically conservative but socially liberal, you get over half of americans call themselves like saying that's what they are. that said, just because people say these things it doesn't necessarily mean they really believe them. if you ask most americans do you want smaller government, they said yes, but if you ask the one government to spend much -- less money, they say yes. if you ask them to cut any particular item, they do
.s. installations in countries like pakistan and egypt which are heavy, large recipients of assistance from the united states. a large majority of that is military. but there is a point in this country that those people don't like us, they take our money and then they burn our flag, and let's just cut them off. obviously, there have been resolutions introduced, so forth. talk about how you think the country ought to respond to that very powerful sentiment. >> well, i think the common thread here is the presence of al-qaeda and its affiliates and the threat that poses to the world. from the standpoint of stability at peaceful transition of governments. and we're reminded of that almost every day. and it's this crescent that sweeps across the middle of the world starting in indonesia and coming all the way across now northern africa and now moving down into the sub sahara parts of africa. this is a threat that has enormous implications. we've seen that ignoring that threat as we did in afghanistan pre-9/11 leads to some dire consequences potentially for americans. it is true the american publ
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3